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This page holds all the pre-performance talks given at stage@leeds by Leeds academics in conjunction with performances based on ancient dramas. In 2010 the production was The Wife of Heracles, based on Sophocles’ tragedy Trachiniae (Women of Trachis), with talks by Emma Stafford, Sue Hamstead and Eleanor OKell. In 2011 the production was Orestes,  based on Euripides’ Orestes, with talks by Malcolm Heath, Roger Brock and Eleanor OKell. In 2013 the production will be based on Sophocles’ Antigone, with talks by Malcolm Heath, Emma Stafford, Eleanor OKell and Elizabeth Pender.

Classics Department Pre-performance Talks I (May 2010):  The Wife of Heracles, George Rhodosthenous (Dir.), stage@leeds

For a general audience interested in the telling of stories from the ancient world in the modern world, these three pre-performance talks by experts in the University of Leeds’ Classics Department make connections between Greek myths and Sophocles’ original tragedy (Trachiniae) and George Rhodosthenous’ collaboratively-scripted modern production version. Each talk takes a different approach and focuses on different aspects of the story of Heracles and ways of telling that story both within and alongside The Wife of Heracles, but all are intended to enhance the audience members’ experience of that production. Suitable for stand-alone listening or as a series.

 Thursday 13th May 2010

Dr. Emma Stafford (Heracles and Greek Art) Is This the Only Story to be Told?

Listen

Slides Emma Stafford Wife of Heracles talk slides

Friday 14th May 2010

Dr. Sue Hamstead (Greek Tragedy) The Sophoclean Roots

Listen

Slides Sue Hamstead Wife of Heracles talk slides

Saturday 15th May 2010

Dr. Eleanor OKell (Classical Reception) C21st Adaptations & (Re)creating Meaning [contains spoilers]

Listen

Slides Eleanor OKell Wife of Heracles talk slides

What audience members said about the talks:

‘Great – really got me in the mood for the play.’

‘Will make the play much more interesting to watch’

 

Classics Department Pre-performance Talks II (March 2011): Orestes, a new adaptation by Alex Clark (2011), George Rhodosthenous (Dir.), stage@leeds 

For a general audience interested in the telling of stories from the ancient world in the modern world, these three pre-performance talks by experts in the University of Leeds’ Classics Department make connections between Greek myths and Euripides’ original tragedy (Orestes) and Alex Clark’s modern production version. Each talk takes a different approach and focuses on different aspects of the story of Orestes and ways of telling that story both within and alongside Orestes, but all are intended to enhance the audience members’ experience of that production. Suitable for stand-alone listening or as a series.

Saturday 19th March 2011

Prof. Malcolm Heath (Greek myth) “I blame the parents”: Orestes’ dysfunctional family

Listen 

Slides “I blame the parents” PowerPoint

Friday 18th March 2011

Dr. Roger Brock (Greek history) Polis and Politics in Euripides’ Orestes

Listen

Thursday 17th March 2011

Dr. Eleanor OKell (Performance/Theatre archaeology) Stage tricks and surprises: audience expectation and Euripides’ Orestes

Listen

Slides Stage Tricks and Surprises PowerPoint

Classics Department Pre-performance Talks III (May 2013): Antigone, George Rodosthenous (Dir.), stage@leeds

For a general audience interested in the telling of stories from the ancient world in the modern world, these four pre-performance talks by experts in the University of Leeds’ Classics Department make connections between Greek society  and Sophocles’ original tragedy (Antigone) and George Rhodosthenous’ collaboratively-scripted modern production version. Each talk takes a different approach and focuses on different aspects of the stories of Antigone and Creon and the meaning of that story both within the tragedy and in the real world of its audience(s). Suitable for stand-alone listening or as a series.

Talks will not include spoilers and are designed to provide information and identify issues which will enrich the audience’s experience of the performance.

Talks are free of charge and will take place before performances, lasting 20 minutes. Talks will start promptly at 19:00, to enable audience members to claim their seats in time for “curtain up” at 19:30. Please arrive a few minutes early in order to get to the talk venue. Talks will be published on this site afterwards.

19:00 Wednesday 8th May

Malcolm Heath, “Learning to be a Politician”

19:00 Thursday 9th May

Emma Stafford, “Antigone: bride of death”

19:00 Friday 10th May

Eleanor OKell, “Translating Plays/Cultures”

19:00 Saturday 11th May

Elizabeth Pender, “Antigone and Values”

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